Smash Brothers PC Alternative Archives

Smash Brothers PC Alternative Archives

Smash Brothers PC Alternative Archives

Smash Brothers PC Alternative Archives

Super Smash Bros. (series)


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Super Smash Bros. (大乱闘スマッシュブラザーズ, Great Fray Smash Brothers), officially referred to as Smash Bros.,SSB, and Smash,is a series of fighting games published by Nintendo, featuring characters from franchises established on Nintendo systems.

The series had a successful start in 1999 with Super Smash Bros. on the Nintendo 64. It achieved even greater success with Super Smash Bros. Melee, released in 2001 for the Nintendo GameCube, becoming the best selling game on that system.

The third installment, Super Smash Bros. Brawl, was released on the Wii on January 31, 2008 in Japan, and was released on March 9th, 2008 in North America.

The fourth and fifth installments were, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U; in North America, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS was released on October 3, 2014 and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U was released on November 21, 2014. Masahiro Sakurai has directed all five games despite HAL Laboratory handing the series to a new developer for Brawl.[1]

The sixth installment, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, was released on the Nintendo Switch on December 7, 2018 worldwide.

History

Super Smash Bros.

Super Smash Bros. was introduced in 1999 for the Nintendo 64. It was released worldwide after selling over a million copies in Japan.[2] It featured eight characters from the start, with four unlockable characters, all of them created by Nintendo or one of its second-party developers.

In multiplayer (Versus) mode, up to four people can play, with the specific rules of each match being predetermined by the players. There are two different types that can be chosen: Time, where the person with the most KOs at the end of the set time wins; and stock, where each person has a set amount of lives, and when it is gone, the player is eliminated.

This game's one-player mode included one adventure mode that always followed the same series of opponents although the player could change the difficulty. Other single player modes exist such as Training and several mini-games, including "Break the Targets" and "Board the Platforms". All of these were included in the sequel, with the exception of Board the Platforms.

In Versus mode, there are nine playable stages: eight based on each of the starting characters (such as Peach's Castle for Mario, Planet Zebes for Samus, and Sector Z for Fox McCloud) and the unlockable Mushroom Kingdom.

Super Smash Bros. Melee

Super Smash Bros. Melee was released November 21, 2001, in Japan; December 3, 2001, in North America; May 24, 2002, in Europe; and May 31, 2002, in Australia for the Nintendo GameCube console. It had a larger budget and development team than Super Smash Bros. did[3] and was released to much greater praise and acclaim among critics and consumers. Since its release, Super Smash Bros. Melee has sold more than 7 million copies and was the best-selling game on the GameCube.[4]

Super Smash Bros. Melee features 26 characters, including Sheik,[5] of which 15 are available initially, more than doubling the number of characters in its predecessor. There are also 29 stages. It introduced two new single-player modes alongside the Classic mode: Adventure mode and All-Star mode. Adventure mode has platforming segments similar to the original's "Race to the Finish" mini-game, and All-Star is a fight against every playable character in the game, allows the player only one life in which damage is accumulated over each battle, and the character is allowed to use only three items which heal all taken damage in between battles. There are also significantly more multiplayer modes and a tournament mode allowing for 64 different competitors whom can all be controlled by a human player, although only up to four players can participate at the same time. Additionally, the game featured alternative battle modes, called "Special Melee," which involve some sort of alteration to the battle (ex: all characters are giant by default, players may only use their jump and standard attack buttons, etc), along with alternative ways to judge a victory, such as through collecting coins throughout the match.

In place of Super Smash Bros.' character profiles, Melee introduced trophies (called "figures" in the Japanese version). The 293 trophies include three different profiles for each playable character, one unlocked in each single-player mode. In addition, unlike its predecessor, Melee contains profiles for many Nintendo characters who are either non-playable or do not appear in the game, as well as Nintendo items, stages, enemies, and elements.

Super Smash Bros. Brawl

Although a third Super Smash Bros. game had been announced long before E3 2006, Nintendo unveiled its first information in the form of a trailer on May 10, 2006, and the game was named Super Smash Bros. Brawl. The trailer featured Solid Snake, of Konami's Metal Gear fame, marking the first time that a third-party character had been introduced as a playable character in a Super Smash Bros. title. A second third-party character, Sonic, from Nintendo's former rival Sega was also confirmed as a playable character on October 10, 2007. Brawl is also the first game in the franchise to support online play via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection.[6]

Brawl also features compatibility with four kinds of controllers (the Wii Remote on its side, the Wii Remote and Nunchuk combination, the Classic Controller, and the Nintendo GameCube controller),[7] while its predecessors only used the one controller designed for that system. The player also has the ability to change the configuration of controls and the controller type.[8]

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U

At E3 2011, it was announced that there will be a fourth and fifth entry in the Super Smash Bros. franchise, which will be available on the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U. Sakurai initially stated that the announcement was made public in order to attract developers needed for the games, as development for the titles did not start until May 2012 due to production on Kid Icarus: Uprising.

On June 21, 2012, Nintendo announced that the creation of the games would be a co-production between Sakurai's Sora Ltd. and Bandai Namco Entertainment. The Nintendo 3DS version was released on September 13th, 2014 in Japan, and was released on October 3rd, 2014 internationally, while the Wii U version was released on November 21st, 2014 in the Americas, on November 28th, 2014 in Europe, on November 29th, 2014 in Australia, and on December 6th, 2014 in Japan.

Initially, the game introduces two new third-party franchises consisting of Mega Man from Capcom and Pac-Man from Bandai Namco. On June 14, 2015, approximately two months after DLC has been introduced, Ryu from Capcom's Street Fighter was added to the game as the first DLC newcomer, making Capcom the first third-party franchise with more than one playable character in the same game.

Later, during the November 12th, 2015 Nintendo Direct, Cloud Strife from Square Enix's Final Fantasy franchise was announced as the second DLC newcomer, thus adding Square Enix to the list of third-parties represented in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U. Lastly, during the Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U - Final Video Presentation on December 15, 2015, Bayonetta, from Sega's stylish action game of the same name, was announced as the fifth and final DLC newcomer.

Future

In October 2014, Sakurai initially stated that he was not finished in developing new Smash Bros. games. However, in a Weekly Famitsu scan, he stated that he doubts in being able to continue game development as a whole if his workload stays the way it was for Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U.[9]

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

On March 8, 2018, a new Super Smash Bros. instalment was announced in a Nintendo Direct. The trailer featured The Inklings from Splatoon, who scored pretty high in the fighters ballot of the fourth and fifth Super Smash Bros. games. The release date for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is December 7th, 2018.

Joker, the first DLC fighter from Atlus' Persona series was released on April 17, 2019, approximately five months after the game's release.

Gameplay

The Super Smash Bros. series is a dramatic departure from many fighting games. Instead of winning by depleting an opponent's life bar, Smash Bros players seek to knock opposing characters off the stage. In Super Smash Bros., characters have a damage total, represented by a percentage value, which rises as they take damage and can exceed 100%.

As a character's percentage rises, he can be knocked progressively farther by an opponent's attacks. To KO an opponent, the player must send that character flying off the edge of the stage, which is not an enclosed arena but rather an area with open boundaries, usually a set of suspended platforms. When a character is knocked off the stage, he may use jumping moves to (attempt to) return; as some characters' jumps are longer-ranged, they may have an easier time "recovering" than others. Additionally, some characters are heavier than others, making it harder for an opponent to knock them off the edge but likewise harder to recover.

Smash Bros's play controls are greatly simplified in comparison to other fighting games. While traditional fighting games such as Street Fighter or Soul Calibur require the player to memorize button-input combinations (sometimes lengthy and complicated, and often specific to a character), Super Smash Bros uses the same one-attack-button, one-control-stick-direction combinations to access all moves for all characters.

Characters are not limited to constantly facing their opponent, but may run around freely. Smash Bros. also implements blocking and dodging mechanics, which can be used both on the ground and in the air. Grabbing and throwing other characters are also possible, allowing for a large variety of ways to attack. (Around 25, on average.)

One additional major element in the Super Smash Bros. series is the inclusion of battle items, of which players can control the frequency of appearance. There are conventional "battering items" with which a player may hit an opponent, such as a baseball bat or a sword, as well as throwing items, including Bob-ombs and shells, and shooting items, either single shot guns or rapid fire blasters.

Recovery items allow the user to lose varying amounts of their damage percent. From the Pokémon franchise come Poké Balls that release a random Pokémon onto the battlefield to assist the user; Brawl introduces a new "Assist Trophy" item which serves a similar purpose, albeit being capable of summoning a wider range of characters from a variety of franchises. Brawl also introduces items called Smash Balls, which allow fighters to perform character-specific attacks, known as Final Smashes.

Characters

Playable characters

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Project M

Project M is a mod of the 2008 fighting gameSuper Smash Bros. Brawl for the Wii, created by the community group known as the Project M Development Team (PMDT; previously known as the Project M Back Room). It is designed to retool Brawl to play more like its two predecessors, Super Smash Bros. (1999) and Super Smash Bros. Melee (2001), in response to fan objections to Brawl's physics, slower-paced gameplay, larger use of chance elements, and mechanics of certain attacks. Project M reintroduces the characters Dr. Mario (albeit as a palette swap of Mario), Mewtwo, and Roy, who were present in Melee but did not return in Brawl. In addition, it features a new art style for in-game menus and allows players to choose certain characters individually when they are only accessible as extensions of other ones in Brawl.

Development started in early 2010 with the goals of reworking the character Falco Lombardi to mechanically play like he did in Melee and increasing the accessibility of the gameplay style, but the project quickly evolved to a full-scale reworking of Brawl. The game's first demo build was released on February 7, 2011, and development continued until December 1, 2015, when the PMDT announced it would cease further development of Project M. The game has received positive comments from reviewers, amassed a player base of over 500,000, surpassed three million downloads, and been played in many professional tournaments.

Gameplay[edit]

Super Smash Bros. Brawl, which Project M modifies, is a fighting game with a battle system more similar to that of the game prior to Brawl, Super Smash Bros. Melee. Players battle in arenas of varying sizes and levels of complexity, controlling characters with a variety of play styles. They can attack one another with their own repertoires of special moves, or with a basic attack. Attacks can be avoided by jumping or using a short-lived shield move. Unlike most traditional fighting games, the Super Smash Bros. games do not include standard health gauges, but a percentage counter; there is no point at which a character is automatically knocked out from the counter getting too high, but they will be knocked farther with increasing damage. Being knocked off the screen—or falling off oneself—causes a knock-out. Players may use items for offensive purposes, such as guns and swords, or for healing purposes, such as food and heart containers. The stages, characters, and items are drawn from Nintendo's video game franchises such as Mario, Pokémon, The Legend of Zelda, and Metroid, along with Sega's Sonic the Hedgehog series and Konami's Metal Gear series. The victor of a match has no standard determining factor. Rather, depending on the settings, victory may be reached, for example, by being the last player alive using a stock system, or by achieving the most KOs after a set amount of time.[1][2]

Super Smash Bros. Melee, Brawl's predecessor in the Super Smash Bros. series, has a similar gameplay style, but there are major differences in areas such as control, general movement styles, and character balancing. Project M was designed to incorporate elements of Melee while still being distinctive in its own right. The designers' "about" page lists a number of aspects from Melee that they aimed to carry over, including fast-paced gameplay, "flowing, natural movement", a "great deal of control" in the player's movements, a balance of offense and defense—though they favored offense over defense slightly—and a complex system of combo attacks. The Project M development team's goal was to give Brawl more balanced gameplay, adding mechanics from Melee back into Brawl, as well as buffing characters to be about as powerful as Fox, the character near-universally considered to be the best in Melee. In addition, some characters who had been present in Melee but scrapped for Brawl were brought back.[3] The game files can be downloaded from its official website and exported to the player's console via an SD card.[4] Players who own an NTSC Wii can install the game without any software modifications,[5] but they must delete all custom stages created in Brawl because of the way files are stored.[4]

Development[edit]

A large number of competitive Super Smash Bros. Melee players were disappointed upon the release of its sequel Brawl six-and-a-half years after the release of Melee. The general consensus among competitive players was that the latter game's developers had reworked the older battling system to better appeal to casual gamers, by making the attacks and movement of the game significantly slower in general and adding a greater degree of randomness, luck, and unpredictability, in contrast to Melee, which has more straightforward, skill-based gameplay. Of particular infamy was a new "tripping" mechanic, by which a character occasionally and randomly slips and falls when changing their direction while running.[6]

Project M first began as a development project to rework the character Falco to play like he did in Melee.[7] The designers' goal at the time was for the game to be accessible to newcomers and encourage people to get better at the game, which was accomplished by creating a character roster that is more balanced.[8] The mod's first demo was announced on January 15, 2011, with a release date of late January or early February in time for the Pound 5 tournament, where it was featured. It featured 14 of the 39 characters in Brawl, as well as new stages Brawl had not included.[9] It was later given a solid date of February 7, 2011.[10] A patch was later created to fix the demo's bugs and fine-tune the player's control of their movement direction after being attacked.[11]

By the release of the game's second demo in March 2011, the team's goals for the mod had expanded to a total overhaul of Brawl to better match Melee's gameplay mechanics.[6] A newer build added 11 characters and was first playable at the Genesis 2 tournament.[12] The second demo, released on April 15, 2012, added four new characters as well as more stages[13] and changes in multiple characters' gameplay mechanics.[14] Players of this second demo reported a number of bugs, but these were fixed shortly afterwards in version 2.1.[15] A demo version numbered 2.5 was announced on September 10, 2012; it featured changes such as balance updates, aesthetic improvements,[16] stage updates, and palette swaps for the characters.[17] Version 2.5 was released on December 28.[18]

Originally as part of an April Fool's Day joke, the PMDT announced that a new "Turbo mode"—inspired by a YouTube video called "Melee Impossible" that showed off powerful combos—would be featured in the upcoming version 3.0.[19] The designers set up a Turbo Tuesday video series showing off the mode with various characters, such as Mario and Ike, once a week.[20] A 2.6 demo was announced on June 26, 2013,[21] and it was released on July 17, 2013.[22] The designers hoped to feature the Turbo mode in this update, but it was not ready in time.[20] The designers added a "Clone Engine" to the game that allowed them to make the character Roy, whose only appearance in the Super Smash Bros. series at the time was in Melee. They designed Roy by taking a clone of Marth and changing the clone into the desired result, along with using the same use of the engine to make the character Mewtwo, albeit with major edits to its model, due to it and Lucario having different move-sets. In order to avoid cease-and-desist letters from Nintendo, the designers explained that they would not use this engine to make new fighters who debuted in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U.[23] The designers added new alternate costumes for a number of characters, including Dr. Mario, who was previously cut from Brawl, for Mario.[24] It was given a release date of December 9, 2013 with a final character count of 41, more than any previous Super Smash Bros. game at the time.[25] Senior designer Corey Archer stated that there would probably be only one more update before he considers Project M complete; he suggested that this update may contain new Nintendo characters.[8]

Version 3.5 was released on November 14, 2014.[26] This revision refines the game's user interface, adds new stages and costumes, adds a few new original musical pieces, redesigns several stages from the original Super Smash Bros. using new HD visuals, and implements new modes such as a debug mode and "All-Star Versus," a mode allowing players to use a different character on every life.[27] A public beta of Version 3.6 was released on June 23, 2015. It added more costumes and stages, new music, a new in-game announcer, and the ability for players to choose between the modified and unmodified versions of stages before battle among other changes.[28][29] This was the first non-demo version of Project M which has had a public beta before final release. Version 3.6 was officially released on August 16, 2015 and included even more additional content on top of what was present in the Beta release.[30] Included were additional balance stages, a brand new Wario Land stage, more music, a new announcer to replace the one used in the Beta and various tweaks and fixes to bugs and errors found during the 3.6 Beta period.

On December 1, 2015, the PMDT announced it would cease further development of Project M, effective immediately, in favor of beginning development on an original project.[31] The development team denied allegations that legal threats from Nintendo were the cause of the project's termination.[32] According to the team's attorney and business consultant, Ryan Morrison, the decision was not made as a result of a cease-and-desist notice or legal action by Nintendo.[31][33] One member of the development team stated that the mod's cancellation was to prevent future legal issues.[34] Members of the PMDT later went on to form the game studio Wavedash Games and develop Icons: Combat Arena, a fighting game with similar mechanics to Project M.[35]

Characters[edit]

Project M includes a number of adjustments and tweaks intended to make the characters from Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. Brawl more balanced, as well as add touches that felt more true to their games of origin. For example, the staff felt that the character Wario in Brawl took too much influence from the WarioWare series of games and not enough from his older appearances in the Wario Land series of games, so they changed him to better reflect the Wario Land games.[36] Mario was redesigned to be a cross between his Melee incarnation and his heavier-hitting clone from the same game, Dr. Mario.[37]Peach was changed to make her turnip attacks more similar to Melee than in Brawl, after Brawl's advent had diminished their usefulness.[38]Bowser, a character who was generally not considered viable for tournament play in previous games, was given armor and increased attack power and made larger. These adjustments gave him the ability to reach enemies easier while making him an easier target for opponents.[39]Yoshi was given an improved recovery and defense.[40] While Ganondorf's strength was changed to function closer to that of his appearance in Melee, his neutral special has also been changed to a floating descent in the air and a backhand to deflect projectiles on the ground.[41] Additionally, the characters Mewtwo and Roy, who had been present in Melee but were cut from the cast in Brawl, were added back to the roster and given new abilities to make the previously low-tier characters more viable.[42]

Before the project was discontinued, several newcomers were planned for addition, including Knuckles the Echidna from Sonic the Hedgehog, Lyn from Fire Emblem, and Isaac from Golden Sun. A development build containing these characters was leaked on 4chan in the aftermath of the project's discontinuation.[43]

Reception[edit]

The Project M Development Team claimed that the 2.0 demo had received 46,000 downloads by May 23, 2012,[15] and 100,000 by December 9, 2013.[8] As of November 15, 2014[update], Project M version 3.0 has been downloaded over 920,000 times.[44] The version 3.6 beta has been downloaded over 106,791 times, and version 3.5 has been downloaded over 615,809 times as of July 25, 2015.[45]

Project M 2.5 was featured for a special invitation 16-person tournament at Apex 2013.[46] Version 3.0 was featured the following year as well, but was omitted from inclusion at Apex 2015, prompting negative reactions from players.[47]

The game has received positive attention from the media. Ryan Rigney of Wired called it the best iteration of Super Smash Bros. and felt that it successfully transforms Brawl into a serious competitive game.[8] Similarly, Patricia Hernandez of Kotaku called it the "best Smash Bros. mod around" and remarked that it "improves the game so much, it practically seems new."[4] Jordan Devore of Destructoid stated that it was one of the highest-quality mods he had ever seen.[48] Zach Betka from GamesRadar called the game "beautiful" and enjoyed the presence of "many edits that will make the average Smash fan squeal."[42]

Prior to its discontinuation, Nintendo's MiiverseInternet forum would apply an automatic ban to those who mentioned Project M on the grounds of it being "criminal content".[32]

References[edit]

  1. ^"The Basic Rules". Smash Bros. DOJO!!. May 22, 2007. Archived from the original on July 3, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  2. ^Cassamassina, Matt (March 4, 2008). "One of the Most Anticipated Nintendo Games Is Finally Here". IGN. Archived from the original on November 28, 2012. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  3. ^"About". Project M Back Room. Archived from the original on September 8, 2015. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  4. ^ abcHernandez, Patricia (December 10, 2013). "How To Play Project M, The Best Smash Bros. Mod Around". Kotaku. Archived from the original on January 30, 2014. Retrieved February 19, 2014.
  5. ^Bogos, Steven (December 10, 2013). "Smash Bros. Brawl's Project M Mod v3.0 Released - Adds Roy, Mewtwo". Escapist Magazine. Archived from the original on February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 19, 2014.
  6. ^ abTodd, Nick (April 21, 2012). "Fans Take Up Arms and Fix Nintendo's Fighter Themselves". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on October 21, 2014. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  7. ^George, Richard (April 19, 2012). "Rebuilding Super Smash Bros". IGN. Archived from the original on February 23, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  8. ^ abcdRigney, Ryan (December 9, 2013). "The Best Super Smash Bros. Isn't Made by Nintendo". Wired. Archived from the original on January 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  9. ^"Announcing the Project M Demo". Project M Back Room. January 15, 2011. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2013.
  10. ^"Project M Demo Release Date Announcement". Project M Back Room. February 3, 2011. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  11. ^"Project M Blog Post #1". Project M Back Room. March 10, 2011. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  12. ^"Genesis 2 Tournament Roster Revealed". Project M Back Room. July 14, 2011. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  13. ^"Demo 2 Release Date: 4/15/2012! 29 Characters!". Project M Back Room. March 31, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  14. ^"Demo 2 Roster Confirmations! Demo 1 Cast Confirmed!". Project M Back Room. April 12, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  15. ^ ab"Project M Demo 2.1 Patch Release!". Project M Back Room. May 23, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  16. ^"Project M Demo 2.5 Announcement". Project M Back Room. September 10, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  17. ^"New Features in Demo 2.5: Character recolors and Stage Updates!". Project M Back Room. December 27, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  18. ^"Demo 2.5 Release Date!". Project M Back Room. December 11, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  19. ^"Turbo Mode Announced". Project M Back Room. April 2, 2013. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  20. ^ ab"We're Back & Turbo Tuesdays". Project M Back Room. September 17, 2013. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  21. ^"Welcome to the New Website". Project M Back Room. June 26, 2013. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  22. ^"Project M Demo 2.6 released!". Project M Back Room. July 17, 2013. Archived from the original on July 21, 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  23. ^"Clone Engine Blogpost - Limits, Restrictions, and Possibilities". Project M Back Room. September 27, 2013. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  24. ^"Alternate Costumes Blogpost". Project M Back Room. November 6, 2013. Archived from the original on November 10, 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  25. ^"Project M 3.0 Trailer Released!". Project M Back Room. November 11, 2013. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  26. ^"Project M on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on December 3, 2015. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  27. ^"Project M 3.5 Released!". Project M Development Team. November 14, 2014. Archived from the original on November 19, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  28. ^"Project M 3.6 Announced!". Project M Development Team. March 29, 2015. Archived from the original on April 1, 2015. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  29. ^"Project M 3.6 Beta Released!". Project M Development Team. June 23, 2015. Archived from the original on July 3, 2015. Retrieved July 3, 2015.
  30. ^"Project M 3.6 Full Changelist". Project M Development Team. August 16, 2015. Archived from the original on August 17, 2015. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  31. ^ ab"Project M". Project M. December 1, 2015. Archived from the original on December 2, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  32. ^ abKlepek, Patrick (December 2, 2015). "Smash Community In Shock Over Sudden End To Popular Mod, Project M". Kotaku. Gawker Media. Archived from the original on December 2, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  33. ^Morrison, Ryan (December 1, 2015). "Video Game Attorney on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on December 2, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  34. ^Klepek, Patrick (December 3, 2015). "The Smash Community Is Chaos Right Now". Kotaku. Gawker Media. Archived from the original on December 5, 2015. Retrieved December 5, 2015.
  35. ^Phillips, Tom (July 17, 2017). "Smash Bros. Fans unveil full game Icons: Combat Arena". Eurogamer. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  36. ^"Wario". Project M Back Room. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  37. ^"Mario". Project M Back Room. Archived from the original on July 2, 2013. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  38. ^"Peach". Project M Back Room. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  39. ^"Bowser". Project M Back Room. Archived from the original on July 2, 2013. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  40. ^"Yoshi". Project M Back Room. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  41. ^"Ganondorf". Project M. Archived from the original on July 1, 2013.
  42. ^ abBetka, Zach (January 10, 2014). "Be Inspired by These Ambitious Video Game Fan Projects". GamesRadar. Archived from the original on February 20, 2014. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  43. ^Khan, Imad (December 11, 2015). "Why the Internet mourned Project M". The Daily Dot. Archived from the original on May 9, 2016. Retrieved August 13, 2016.
  44. ^Project M Back Room (user ProjectMGame). "Project M on Twitter" (Twitter). Archived from the original on December 3, 2015.
  45. ^"Download". Project M. Archived from the original on September 19, 2015.
  46. ^"Invitational Project M event at APEX 2013". Project M Back Room. December 19, 2012. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  47. ^Ian J. Barker (November 10, 2014). "Fighting game organizer targeted with death threats". The Daily Dot. Archived from the original on January 28, 2015. Retrieved January 27, 2015.
  48. ^Devore, Jordan (November 19, 2013). "Smash Bros. mod Project M 3.0 gets one heck of a trailer". Destructoid. Archived from the original on February 24, 2014. Retrieved February 19, 2014.

External links[edit]

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Smash Brothers PC Alternative Archives

Can't Play Super Smash Bros. Ultimate? Play These 5 Fighting Games Instead

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is out now for the Nintendo Switch. It features Nintendo staples such as Mario and Bowser alongside characters from other franchises like Sonic from Sonic the Hedgehog and Simon Belmont from Castlevania. With over 70 characters to choose from, Smash Bros. Ultimate may be daunting for some to get into and if you live in regions where Nintendo doesn't have an official presence, getting a Nintendo Switch and Super Smash Bros. may end up being an expensive proposition. Keeping these in mind, here are five fighting games you should check out if you can't play Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

1. Tekken 7
A fighting game list isn't complete without Tekken and Tekken 7 delivers a dark plot in its single-player mode, revamped critical attack mechanics, and a modified movement system all while sticking to 3D arena-styled levels and fluid combat that have been a series hallmark since the very first game in arcades and on the PS1. You can get it for Rs. 1,999 on PS4 and Rs. 989 on PC via Steam ($20 in the US).

2. Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition
Despite having a rocky launch back in 2016, Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition is the first major update to Street Fighter V that gives you new modes such as Extra Battle Mode, expanded single-player content and a revamped UI. If you already own Street Fighter V and haven't played it for awhile, this is a free update. Thanks to the myriad of fixes and additional game modes, there's more than a reason to give Capcom's fighting game a go. And if you're new to the series, this is a good starting point thanks to its many tweaks and changes since 2016. It's available on PS4 for Rs. 2,750 and PC via Steam for Rs. 2,450 ($20 in the US).

3. Dragon Ball Fighterz
Made by the studio responsible for BlazBlue: Cross Tag Battle, Dragon Ball Fighterz features over the top action with an exceptionally easy to access control scheme that would have you pulling off flashy moves like a pro. Furthermore, its adherence to the source material makes it worth it if you're a fan of the long-running anime series. It's available on PS4 for Rs. 2,755 ($33.20 in the US).

4. BlazBlue: Cross Tag Battle
BlazBlue: Cross Tag Battle is a 2D fighting game featuring characters from games such as Persona 4 Arena and Under Night In-Birth and anime such as RWBY. It stands out thanks to its colourful cel-shaded visuals coupled with intricate animations and a story mode that's accessible even if you don't understand the lore of the various franchises. It's out now on PS4 for Rs.2,750 and PC via Steam for Rs. 1,099 ($38 in the US).

5. SoulCalibur 6
With a robust character creation suite, a generous single-player campaign, and an intuitive yet deep combat system, SoulCalibur 6 is an entertaining reboot of this weapon-based fighting series. Thanks to cameos from the likes of Geralt of Rivia from The Witcher series and 2B from Nier Automata, there's enough for fans and newcomers alike. With a greater focus on characters from other games, SoulCalibur 6 could very well be the mature version of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The SoulCalibur 6 price is Rs.3,999 on PS4 ($48 in the US).

What's your favourite fighting game? Let us know in the comments.

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