Install LDS Tools for Windows Archives

Install LDS Tools for Windows Archives

install LDS Tools for Windows Archives

install LDS Tools for Windows Archives

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Re: Older Gospel Library version availability

Postby MartinEwards » Mon Nov 25, 2019 2:49 am

TomEccles wrote:After I made the post, I continued to work the problem. I found an APK file for Gospel Library version 4.2.3.2 on two independent websites (apk20.com and apkpure.com). I downloaded both. They were identical, so I felt confident they had not been tampered with. I used them to install Gospel Library on my phone. The installation worked fine, and I now have the scriptures, the latest General Conference, and other material on my phone. I suspect it will not work as well as the current version, but so far I have not encountered any problems.


Sometimes, you can't directly download an app from marketplaces like Google Play or Appstore since the updated version of the app is incompatible with your device (Android version) and I find that sidedownloading APK file is the best alternative. There're some third-party sites which provide different versions of the application such as apkpure, apktodie and apktovi. Please note that if you want to find out the most proper variant of an APK file to your device, you need to download AID64 app. Then compare the parameters of your device to the app variants (Architecture, DPI and Android version)
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, install LDS Tools for Windows Archives

How to install the PowerShell Active Directory module

This guide explains how to install the Active Directory (AD) module for PowerShell Core 6.0 and Windows PowerShell. For Windows PowerShell, the tutorial describes how to install the AD module for Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2016.

Michael Pietroforte is the founder and editor in chief of 4sysops. He has more than 35 years of experience in IT management and system administration.
Latest posts by Michael Pietroforte (see all)

The installation of the AD module varies significantly for the different Windows and PowerShell versions. At the time of this writing, the AD module that comes with RAST does not work with PowerShell Core 6.0. However, this guide explains how you can manage Active Directory from PowerShell Core even on macOS and Linux.

Windows 7 ^

On a Windows 7 computer, you can follow this procedure to install the Active Directory module:

  1. Download the Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT) for Windows 7.
  2. Open the Control Panel, start typing features, and then click Turn Windows features on or off.
  3. Scroll down to Remote Server Administration Tools and enable the Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell in Remote Server Administration Tools > Role Administration Tools > AD DS and AD LDS Tools.
  4. Run Import-Module ActiveDirectory on a PowerShell console.

Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell on Windows 7

If the Windows 7 machine only has PowerShell 2.0 installed, you have to add the Import-Module ActiveDirectory command to your profile because PowerShell doesn't load modules automatically. For instance, you can import the module in %UserProfile%\My Documents\WindowsPowerShell\profile.ps1. Makes sure you've set your execution policy to either RemoteSigned or Unrestricted: Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned.

Another option is to open the module from the Administrative Tools folder in the Control Panel.

Active Directory Module in Administrative Tools

Windows Server 2008 R2 ^

If your Windows Server 2008 R2 machine is a domain controller, the PowerShell Active Directory Module is already installed. You only have to install the module on member servers. The procedure on Windows Server 2008 R2 is similar to that on Windows 7. (Note that the module is not available for Windows Server 2008.)

One difference is that you don't have to download RSAT because the tools are already available on Windows Server 2008 R2.

  1. In Server Manager, click Add features, and then:
  2. Select Active Directory module for Windows PowerShell in Remote Server Administration Tools > Role Administration Tools > AD DS and AD LDS Tools.

Alternatively, you can install the module from a PowerShell console:

Import-Module ServerManagerAdd-WindowsFeature RSAT-AD-PowerShell

After copying the module to your computer, you have to import it:

Import-ModuleActiveDirectory

Or you can right-click the PowerShell icon on the taskbar and select Import system modules.

Import system modules

As on Windows 7, if you want to make the import permanent, you have to add the above import command to your PowerShell profile. Notice this description assumes you haven't updated PowerShell 2 on your Windows Server 2008 R2 machine (see the description about Windows 7).

Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10 ^

Things are a lot easier in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10. All you have to do is download and install RSAT (Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10). The installation enables all tools by default, and you also don't have to import the module. You can use the AD module right away after you install RSAT.

Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016 ^

As on Windows Server 2008 R2, the AD module is already installed on domain controllers on Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2016. On member servers, you can add the module as a feature in Server Manager.

  1. Start Server Manager.
  2. Click Manage > Add Roles and Features.
  3. Click Next until you reach Features.
  4. Enable Active Directory module for Windows PowerShell in Remote Server Administration Tools > Role Administration Tools > AD DS and AD LDS Tools.

Install the AD module on Windows Server 2016

Alternatively, you can install the module from a PowerShell console:

Install-WindowsFeatureRSAT-AD-PowerShell

Installing the AD module on Windows Server 2012 with PowerShell

There's no need to import the Server Manager module first, as on Windows Server 2008 R2. You also don't have to import the AD module after the installation.

If you want to verify the successful installation of the module, you can just run the Get-ADuser cmdlet.

Install the AD module on PowerShell Core 6.x on a Windows computer ^

  1. Install RSAT with the method matching to your operating system (see sections above).
  2. Install the WindowsCompatibility module.
    Install-Module-NameWindowsCompatibility
  3. Load the WindowsCompatibility module like usual with the Import-Module cmdlet
    Import-Module-NameWindowsCompatibility
  4. Load the ActiveDirectory module with the Import-WinModule cmdlet
    Import-WinModule-NameActiveDirectory

All versions: Import the ActiveDirectory module remotely ^

Create an interactive remote session

The simplest option is to create an interactive remote session to your domain controller with the Enter-PSsession cmdlet:

Enter-PSsessionMyDomainConroller

You can then work right away with the AD cmdlets. This option is good if you only occasionally manage AD on a PowerShell console and if you don't have to execute local scripts.

Managing Active Directory on PowerShell Core in an interactive remote session

Import the AD module from a remote session

The second option uses implicit remoting and allows you to run the AD cmdlets from a local session. However, you execute the AD cmdlets remotely on a domain controller. In practice, you won't notice much of difference in locally installed cmdlets. To import the AD module on PowerShell Core 6.0, execute these commands:

$S=New-PSSession-ComputerNameMyDomainConroller
Import-Module-PSsession$S-NameActiveDirectory

Import the AD module on PowerShell Core 6.0

The first command creates a PowerShell session (PSsession) on the domain controller (replace MyDomainController with the name of your DC) and establishes a persistent connection. Next, we import the ActiveDirectory module from this remote PSsession into our local session.

You can now use all AD module cmdlets on your local PowerShell Core console. Just keep in mind the commands always execute remotely.

If you often work with AD, you can add the above commands to your profile, for instance in Documents\PowerShell\Profile.ps1.

Export the remote AD module to a local module

Alternatively, you can export the AD cmdlets from a remote session to a local module:

$S=New-PSSession-ComputerNameMyDomainController
Export-PSsession-Session$S-ModuleActiveDirectory-OutputModuleRemoteAD
Remove-PSSession-Session$S

Exporting the Active Directory module to a local module

These commands will create a local module in your Documents folder under PowerShell\Modules\RemoteAD. However, like with the above solution, you will be working with implicit remoting, and all cmdlets will execute remotely. The local RemoteAD module only links to the cmdlets on the domain controller. If you want to use the RemoteAD module on other machines with PowerShell Core, simply copy the RemoteAD folder to the PowerShell Core module folder on the second machine.

The difference with the "import solution" is that in the "export solution," PowerShell only establishes a connection to the domain controller when you use an AD cmdlet the first time. You also don't have to add the above commands to your profile because PowerShell will load the local RemoteAD module automatically. However, the downside to this option is you might have to repeat the procedure after updating the AD module on the domain controller.

PowerShell Core and Windows PowerShell modules ^

Note that you can use Windows PowerShell together with PowerShell Core on the same machine and work with the different AD modules in both shells. If you installed RSAT, the AD module for Windows PowerShell will reside in this folder:

$env:windir/System32/WindowsPowerShell/v1.0/Modules/ActiveDirectory

If you used the export solution, the RemoteAD module will be in this folder:

$env:userprofile/Documents/PowerShell/Modules/RemoteAD

PowerShell Core and Windows PowerShell use different folders

PowerShell Core does not import modules in WindowsPowerShell folders, and Windows PowerShell does not load PowerShell Core modules, which are always in PowerShell folders. Thus, you don't have to worry about conflicts between the different AD modules in PowerShell Core and Windows PowerShell.

Conclusion ^

Using the Active Directory module has become simpler with each PowerShell version up to Microsoft's release of PowerShell Core 6.0. However, working with implicit remoting and remote sessions has various advantages. One advantage is that you can use disconnected remote sessions. This allows you to start a script, shut down your client computer, and retrieve the results from the remote machine later. If you often work with remote sessions, you should become familiar with the different ways you can use PowerShell remote sessions. Once you get used to working with remoting, you probably won't miss the local AD module for PowerShell Core.

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Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
install LDS Tools for Windows Archives

Looking to download LDS Tools app for PC/Laptop? In Mangaaz.net, we have shared LDS Tools for Windows, LDS Tools for Mac or LDS Tools for PC download link.

The LDS Tools app provides members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with the ability to contact ward and stake members, access event calendars, and locate Church meetinghouses and temples. Leaders can also access additional membership information and reports.

Main Features of LDS Tools App For PC Free Download:

– Directory. View contact information and photos for the members of your ward and stake.
– Organizations. View ward and stake callings by organization.
– Calendars. View event calendars for your ward and stake.
– Lists. Create custom lists of members in your ward and stake.
– Missionaries. Access contact information for the full-time missionaries assigned to and serving from your ward and stake.
– Meetinghouses. Find meetinghouse locations and addresses, sacrament meeting times, and contact information for bishops.
– Temples. View your assigned temple, temples nearest your current location, ordinance schedules, and temple recommend expiration reminders.
– Reports. Ward and stake leaders may access membership reports for members of their ward and stake.

To install the LDS Tools app on PC you will first need to install an Android emulator such as Nox App Player.

How To Download and Install LDS Tools App on PC (Windows 10/8/7 and Mac)

Step 1. To begin, downloading Nox App Player on PC. DOWNLOAD LINK.

Step 2. Once downloaded, install Nox emulator on on your PC.

Step 3. Launch Nox emulator on PC and then access the Google Play Store by signing to your Google account

Step 4. Go to the Google Play Store and then search for “LDS Tools“. You will see the search result for LDS Tools Download For PC, then click Install to instantly install the app.

Download and Install LDS Tools App For PC (Windows 10/8/7 and Mac)

Download LDS Tools from Google Play store

Or you can easily install LDS Tools app on the PC by applying the LDS Tools APK file if you can’t find an app on the Google Play store. You may also like: How To Download APK Files From Google Play Store To PC

Now you can launch and use LDS Tools app on PC using Nox App Player.

VIDEO TUTORIAL: How To Install LDS Tools app on PC (Windows 10/8/7) without Bluestacks

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
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